Archive for the ‘DAY 2 DAY’ Category

So I’m in Bromsgrove, Birmingham for the weekend; it’s the 3rd installment of the Women and Leadership residency programme for us 14 African women resident in various parts of the United Kingdom.

Yeah? First off, it was great to meet up with everyone last night, see all the ladies again, catch up on what we’ve all been up to since the last time we saw each other in May, and all of that! The weekends away are an absolute blessing, a time to reflect/take care of myself, build my leadership and community interaction skills, and enjoy fabulously prepared food!

The Center is set on a sprawling estate – loads of green, peace and quiet, and because the farmers and butchers are local, all the food we’re served is fresh, organic, authentic, and so full of flavor!

So, first night we had baby potatoes and chicken wrapped in bacon and cheese. Incredible. I brought my own veg (anyone say team #FitFam), and I truly enjoyed the meal. Dessert however was toffee cake in a lovely toffee pudding (did you see my weight loss plans jump out of the window)?

Dinner over, we did an interesting exercise which was to randomly list things that influence our values on a flipchart (so things like society, environment, other people, education, religion, etc.), and then we did drawings depicting our life’s journeys and talking through them in groups. Very nice to do that, basically plot our life’s graphs and explore how different things that happened to/for/around us have shaped who we are and how we do certain things.

After all of that happened, I retired to my room to try to connect to the WIFI in the place. And then Amanda came over, and it was really nice to have a ‘catch up’ type conversation, a little more in-depth than what happened in the group. We were up till 1.20am (yes I checked) and then I went to sleep.

I woke up laughing about 5am because of some hilarious dream I was having (involving PSquare), and heavy as my eyes were, soon as my phone beeped to tell me I’d connected to the internet, I knew I wasn’t going back to sleep. We are currently expecting the same miracle for my computer.

Decided to go for a run about 7am and I was reminded that I’m such a wuss! Walked for like 7minutes, and then it dawned on me that no one knew I’d left the building. Remember the entire gist about green and farms? Here’s a look!

2014-09-21 13.31.57

Beautiful, serene… I could live here forever! (Long as they give us wifi jor…)

2014-09-21 13.32.35

 

And then I thought, hian! What if something/someone comes out of nowhere and grabs me? Think ‘Criminal Minds’, ‘CSI New York, Miami, Aba, Oshogbo (since it seems there’s a different CSI for every city)’, or my recent favorite, ‘Person of Interest’ (which I started watching because of something Gbenga Sesan said at a training I attended in August).

And so ladies and gentlemen, I started running, and back to the Center building! You can say what you will, laugh all you want; I’m not listening! Lol!

That’s it really. I showered, had breakfast, and joined the morning session, where I wrote this.

*Written on the 19th of September.

Two weeks ago, I decided to take advantage of INEC‘s registration exercise to get a voter card. What’s all the activism for if I can’t vote? And so far, the chances that I will be in Nigeria during the elections in 2015 are very high.

So it was off to Government Secondary School in Lifecamp that Monday morning to get it done.

Got there about 8am, and if I had any sense, I would have known (from the crowd I met there) I didn’t stand a chance. I would also have known that heels on the day wasn’t the smartest idea. To be fair to myself though, I actually believed I would be able to get it done and then head off to a training I had fixed for past noon; looking back I’m sure even God must have been giggling at me and my plans.

9am and INEC guys still hadn’t come. There was no place to sit and my shoes were starting to hurt. People were gisting with the Police guys and promising them heaven on earth. Me? I was sipping lipton.

9.31am. INEC guys came in a white van, and as they were unloading their stuff a police truck came (siren and PSA included). A lady (whose appearance, voice, and intonation reminded me of Dame Peshe) announced that people who had registered before should leave or they would face the “full wrath of the law”. If I had a pound for every time I’ve heard that phrase in this our Nigeria I’d be super wealthy.

Anyway, noise warnings from the lady lasted another 20 minutes, and then the police truck left. By this time we’d been asked to write our names on a list so we’d be attended to.

The men seemed to get theirs done without a fuss, but we ladies had to have two separate fights over the order of names on the list. #CatFightTinz

One torn list and a few exchanged curses after, our list was sent in to the INEC guys and the wait began. About noon and no where getting close to getting registered, I left. Plus I had a visitor (and the attendant cramps) that demanded I leave and sort myself (forgive the TMI).

Got back about 2pm, and it still wasn’t my turn. Matter of fact, it became even clearer that it wouldn’t get to me. I chatted with various groups of people and apart from the INEC guys still dealing with lists they collected on Saturday and Sunday, I learned from more than one group that the police (who were at the doors to ensure people were orderly) were collecting money to facilitate quicker entrance to meet the INEC guys.

Still, I waited. Most of my day had been wasted anyway. I was content watching everything from a safe distance.

About 3pm, people started getting testy. Being the last day of the registration, with no extension in sight, people were agitated. The police started using belts and things to get people to disperse. Was really disturbing for me to watch for a number of reasons.

1. Ebola – as we all know, body fluids are a vehicle for the transmission of this virus. The sun was scorching so of course people were sweating. Some others were spitting (yuck), and a few others were cleaning out their nostrils on every inch of ground they could find. Now people were thronging, pushing, a few of them fell, it wasn’t pretty. Absolutely disgusting.

2. Whipping people. Really? Really? Why on earth? Do you blame the people for becoming restive when some of them had been there since 6.30am and then because some others who came about noon had ‘tips’ for the police, they got bumped to the top of the list for registration?

I spoke to one of the policemen whipping people, and the conversation is reproduced below.

FGS – Sir, it’s 4pm. Won’t it be better to tell these people what their options for registration after now are, instead of whipping them?

Police – Did you see me whipping anyone?

FGS – (A little shocked at his question) Yeah! I’ve been standing and watching you for the last 30 minutes. I feel like…

Police (cuts in) – You are making allegations against my person! I am an officer of the law! Do you know what we are doing here?

FGS – Yes I know you’re supposed to keep the peace, keep the people orderly, but you’re not supposed to whip…

Police (cuts in, super incensed now) – Did you see me whip anybody? If you talk too much I’ll take you to the station…

FGS (cuts in, a little ticked off) – stop spitting on me. And are you threatening me? Are you actually threatening me? (To be honest I was a little flustered, but I don’t know why I was smiling)

Police – You can write anything you want to write! I don’t care! I am an officer of the law…

FGS – (cuts in) This is not a productive conversation, you’re not listening to me, and you’re still spitting on me. (And I turned and walked away).

I tweeted.

Screenshot 2014-09-01 16.04.09

And yes, I took a picture.

2014-08-25 16.47.39Good thing was, he didn’t touch anyone else (least till I left about 5pm), and I caught him stealing glances at me from time to time.

No, I didn’t get registered.

The End.

 

A few times this week I’ve had cause to use this phrase “may we not become the thing/person we criticise” and after I used it this evening while chatting with my darling girl/expert tensioner Francesca, I decided to write about it!

First off, I was pushing off to Lagos on Tuesday for a meeting/meeting some actors on location and I met Nasiru at the airport. Now, Nasty (what we affectionately call him) is a long time friend and former boss at the BBC World Service Trust while I was there.

Nasty is a very good friend of mine (offline and online), and probably doesn’t remember how he encouraged me sometime in 2009 when I had a really rough period because of one silly diary I found. I remember everything you said to me Nasty, and I’m super grateful!

Anyway, so we talked about our old office, and how things have changed, how people we thought of in one way became a totally different thing, and I expressed fears about the corrupting effect power has on people. Nasty was quick to remind me that not everyone is misled by power, and we wrapped that conversation with “may we not be the thing/person/people we criticise”.

The day before I was trying to register for a voter card (didn’t happen eventually), and I remember thinking all sorts of angry thoughts because of the really stressful day I ended up having. These thoughts included everyone who had something to do with the really shoddy preparations for the registration, including the policeman who threatened me (chronicle coming up soon). And while I talked to someone about it later that evening, he tried to make excuses for a few of the people I had it really bad for. Of course I didn’t want to think of it, but I did (later), and I hoped people would give me the benefit of the doubt when I needed it.

And then there was the conversation with Fran earlier this evening, we talked about a somewhat mutual friend and the drama she gets at home. While I agree that she definitely could have it better, I also know that it’s very few parents who would intentionally set out to hurt their kids. And so I said to Fran that I pray we don’t become the parents our kids talk to their friends about, the ones who give them loads of drama.

There’s at least two more instances this week that I’ve used this phrase, and I honestly don’t remember if I came up with it or if I read it somewhere, or if someone said it to me. I just know that it’s worth taking a minute to reflect before we chew the next person out. Not saying to cover evil or condone ‘anyhowness’, but people make mistakes, and we can too.

Have a smashing new week!

 

PS: It’s Francesca’s birthday next week, and I’m super excited! Francesca is a beautiful daughter of Zion, and has become one of the strongest arms I lean on, always there when I need her. I would go on and on now but there’d be nothing to put in the card, and she’s the kind of person who would refer me to this post just to tell me I’ve said the same thing twice! Love you long time B!

PSS: She wrote for the first #31Days31Writers series, and she’s so intense! Loved her piece!

PSSS: God please do not let anything happen to Joan Rivers (who is reportedly on life support). She might have a really caustic mouth but I really like her!

Hi guys!

Been a while I wrote, and I’m sorry… I’ve written a lot of stuff, but as always, the challenge is typing it up for it to make sense for you!

Anyway, something happened last night.

Screenshot 2014-08-15 10.23.08

Screenshot 2014-08-15 10.23.23

Screenshot 2014-08-15 10.23.32

Screenshot 2014-08-15 10.23.40

Screenshot 2014-08-15 10.24.07

Screenshot 2014-08-15 10.24.20

Screenshot 2014-08-15 10.24.34

 

I was in Lagos last week, and driving to a super interesting service with my girl Francesca we saw so many people crossing the expressway just under the pedestrian bridge. Francesca was super upset (and to be honest I was puzzled by it) but seeing this guy yesterday evening just broke me.

People, please let’s be a bit careful. As we drive, as we walk, as we sit in cars driven by other people, we must be careful. Nigeria (especially) is in a bad place with all sorts of things snuffing out lives (ebola, Boko Haram, Cholera, etc.); the least we can do is cover our bases.

Have a good weekend everyone!

The bible says, “take heed what you hear”; ever come across that before? I know I have.

Based on the three stories I’m going to share below though, perhaps for both males and females, we can/ should introduce “take heed, who you marry”.

Before then, am I married myself? No; matter of fact I’m single (so we can get that out of the way early).

Ready to share 3 stories with me? Without messing the facts up, I’ll try to protect the identities of all three couples (Or ex-couples)

  • Boy meets girl who is in her late 20’s and under a bit of pressure by her married siblings and of course her folks. Therefore, she ‘allows’ a lot if things and her family foots the bill minus (N15, 000/ $90) that the guy contributes to the entire preparations. Less than a year later, he’s moved out of her house (where she pays rent) because amongst other things she’s not ‘submissive’, and her family has returned the dowry they collected. The End.
  • Boy meets high-flyer type chic, get married, have a beautiful daughter. Husband invests the Mrs.’ money (huge sums) in a string of failed deals/leads. Of course they start to have problems, wife starts to suffer emotionally and at the peak of their trouble (when he stops her from seeing their daughter for a period of time) she develops high blood pressure, and is said to be acting ‘weird’. At the time I wrote this, she’d been buried less than 10days ago
  • Boy meets girl and everyone thinks they’re a gorgeous couple except the ones who knew the inner workings of the relationship. She hits him, continuously, ridiculing him sometimes in the presence of his friends; did I mention they were engaged to be married? Man snapped one day and called it off. Now she says he ‘used’ her, and has wasted her time.

Three stories done. Might seem like it’s all doom and gloom ladies and gentlemen, but I promise you it’s not. For each of those tragic stories, I promise you there are ten, hundreds and thousands of success stories around. Even better, you have friends and family with super successful marriages, so you’ll agree it’s not a myth.

I stumbled across a blog today (dunno how I didn’t hear about them before)- Naijahusband.com where a man and his wife (Naijawife) chronicle the ups and downs, happy and not so happy times in their marriage. Not a hundred percent sure it’s a real life or brilliant scripting but you should have a look. Really interesting stuff there!

Also, I read somewhere once that marrying the wrong person is not only hell on earth, but will lead you to hell because of the amount of mistakes/missteps you will make.

Ladies (especially), no pressure at all. Don’t let anyone put you under pressure, and don’t do it to yourself too (I know about self-inspired pressure don’t worry). When he comes, he will come. There’ll be no shadow of doubt.

Guys too, no pressure, whether from family/peers or self-imposed. When you meet the ‘her’ that God designed for you, trust me you’ll know.

Who best to confirm your choice than The One who created you two? Get on your knees ladies and gentlemen, and ask Him to bring them to you! And He will!

While you wait, improve yourself, strengthen /solidify your relationship with your God (who is your first love ANYWAY), and have fun!

PS – Written on the 12th of July.

 

 

 

 

I’m horrible with writing about death, but then I guess everyone is, and at some point or the other in life, we will have to do things we’d much rather we didn’t. Even the death of an enemy leaves a sour taste, talk less of a friend, family member, or in this case, someone I really admired and would have been super privileged to meet.

I watched a TedTalk at the end of 2013 Mr. Dumor gave on reporting stories out of Africa, and he should know, he’s been the face of BBC’s Focus on Africa from the inception of the programme in 2012. Everyday. His talk was so funny! Beyond the laughs, I was totally smitten by his confidence, his eyes, alive with excitement and maybe mischief and I was upset when it ended.

I told myself that I would meet him in the New Year, and even though I didn’t immediately have a plan to do that, I purposed to try.

On the evening of the 17th, I was chatting with a much older friend of mine, and Komla came on. I mentioned I was a massive fan and I wanted to meet him, and this friend said they’d been in the same class at Harvard and sure, he’d facilitate an introduction the next morning. I was super excited, and the only thing that stopped me from insisting on an introduction there and then was the fact that it was a little late, and I was literally on my way home.

And then about midday the next day, I saw on Twitter that Komla Dumor had passed. What??? “Cruel jokers”, I thought, racing to BBC’s website to prove they were wrong. BBC didn’t carry it immediately, but staff were already tweeting condolence messages.

Just like that, he was gone. Aged 41, Komla Dumor passed of a suspected heart attack. One day on TV, gone the next day. The uncertainty that this life is.

I grieved like I had lost a personal friend – because it was yet another reminder that life is short, and we must do whatever we need to do as soon as we can. Grieved all the way to Instagram.

Screenshot 2014-06-02 05.40.16

And so today, exactly six months after, somehow I can now write and bid him farewell, hope he’s in a better place, and tell him he was a shining light for us young uns.

More importantly, I pray for God’s great comfort on his family.

Rest in peace Komla Dumor.

Enhanced by Zemanta

So at the Hope XXL Triple A Summit we were asked to write short speeches we could present if we had two minutes to address the world. The speeches would be recorded and uploaded to YouTube. Now, I don’t know if they’ve been uploaded but here’s what I wrote.

If I had two minutes to address the world I would say

  • Stop, think – a lot of the evils we perpetuate against each other (wars, violence, intolerance) would be no more if we thought a bit more

I would say

  • Listen, learn – our universe speaks new things to us daily, if only we seek its knowledge.

I would say

  • Live, learn – long as our lives may be, it is more about the life and love in our lives than the length of the life.

I would say

  • Help, hope – the existence of a new star does not diminish the brightness or shining of the others.

I would say

  • Care, share – our earth is on loan to us from our grandchildren and it is uncharitable not to repay a loan, or to do so with damaged goods

If I could address the world for two minutes I would use one. I would ask every one to use the second minute to look the next man in the eye, recognize the beauty and positivity in them, and bow to it. Namaste!

Cheesy right? I love it! (If I don’t love it, who will? Apart from you, who I know loves me to bits:))!

Now, back in London after the conference, I went to Westfield Shopping Mall around Shepherd’s Bush and amongst other things I got up to, I had dinner. Want to see?

Lebanese... I don't remember what it was called on the menu but the fish was fab!!! I'm eating a lot more clean proteins these days by the way, lifestyle changes over fad diets babay!

Lebanese… I don’t remember what it was called on the menu but the fish was fab!!! I’m eating a lot more clean proteins these days by the way, lifestyle changes over fad diets babay!

 

Now, on the way home I heard music, like really fabulous drumming coming from something that sounded like pots and pans. So we went to see. I had to make a video! Matter of fact, I made two; the guy was so good!

And then I couldn’t stop watching so I made another one!

That’s it about this post, I really had to share this video, and I hope you like it as much as I did!

There must be something about drums and me; I have another blogpost with a video of young boys playing drums too, this time made out of milk tins!

What is that super cool thing about you? Tell us about it!

Thank God for strength, safety and the miraculous way He alone refreshes our bodies when we sleep! Like, I’ve never been more grateful for those three before, I’m more than grateful today!

Somehow I had a really quiet month of April, spent in Abuja, sometimes wondering if things would work out the way I had planned or not. Some days I was downcast, disillusioned, fit in any related words that start with a ‘D’ if you please.

And then May came, and I started to see some light. Started with finding someone interested in some work I want to do, the first person to be even remotely interested in over 7 months of searching. Amazing!

May also brought a lot of clarity as far as my emotions are concerned. I could truly smile, pick up and move on without a certain fear that had tugged at my heartstrings since the beginning of the year/

Maybe all of this happened because this is my birth month? Maybe God in His infinite mercies smiled at me, decided to start my birthday pressies early! I’m so grateful!

As far as trips are concerned, May has been the craziest so far – truly the craziest. First it was off to Birmingham for the second weekend of the Women, Leadership, and Change residency for Diasporan women. It was an amazing weekend with the ‘Power 14’, a good time for me to catch my breath, and I’m super excited at what we’ve planned and will do with our new partnership!

Then it was off to Hinton-in-the-Hedges, somewhere in Northamptonshire to celebrate my birthday by jumping out of the sky! Whoop! Truly amazing!

Back to Abuja two days after, and in Lagos the next day for Chude Jideonwo’s book launch.

A little about the flight to Lagos shall we? I got to the airport, checked in, and for a 7pm flight, we started boarding by 6.45pm. While I was pondering about the darkening clouds, the captain, standing the doorway said we should enter quickly cos if the rain started we would be delayed by an hour. In my mind I thought, “surely if you wanted to leave early the flight should have started boarding a little earlier. SMH.” Then I looked at both my arms to see if my wings had been activated so I could fly over the other passengers to get to my seat. Tueh.

And then the voice of the announcer came on, doing the security drill and all. She was so incoherent at first I thought she was singing a traditional number and had forgotten the mic on. And then I heard, ‘HEGZIT’, and I’m sorry but I chuckled the minute I realized what she was trying to say.

50 minutes later, we touched down (thank you Lord), and it was off to a drink with a friend, and then off to spend to start a really fun weekend at my sister girl’s house! Francesca is several shades of amazing, thank you for being such an amazing host!

The end of the flight bit, so let’s ‘hegzit’ and go back to the book launch! J

Chude is a friend, boss, and someone I’m super proud of, and his book, “Are We The Turning Point Generation” is a must read! It’s a collection of essays written over seven years, and Oby Ezekwesili described it aptly in her keynote address at the event when she said, “welcome to a new Nigeria through the eyes of Chude Jideonwo”. Truly inspiring, this young man.

I actually wrote this piece on board a flight to Abuja on Monday morning, the day after the launch, for a meeting I only decided to attend that morning. Then, I ran back to Lagos that evening, and it was off to Blighty!

Got in the next morning, and it was off to The Hague, which is where this post ends, and my chronicles from The Hague begin!

*Written on the 26th of May*

Enhanced by Zemanta

I woke up one day in the earlier months of 2013 knowing I wanted to volunteer again. It’d been about two years that I volunteered with Read International and joined a bake sale at BCU (that was a lot of fun)!

And so I said I’d join the Red Cross, partly because I knew my mum’s been a member since forever, and also because I’d read (several times) of the various ways the Red Cross helps to make lives in difficult situations easier.

I guess the time wasn’t right then because a few things went south soon after (talk about the universe aligning to royally screw a person), and so I shelved the idea after I’d sent the first email asking for the procedures.

2014 rolled by, and with that, a deep desire to do things I’d never done before, get over as many fears I can get over (because I’m scared of a lot of things), and read very widely.

And then the urge to join the Red Cross came back, even stronger than before. I knew I’d go ahead with it this time, especially since I’d seen an accident recently and I felt hopeless because I couldn’t do anything to help.

And that’s how I picked up on the thread of emails from the year before, attended an interview with the lovely Hannah, and after a welcome session, guess who became the newest member of the British Red Cross, Kent and Gravesend area? Moi!

I must say, attending Monday meetings and training sessions have been a blessing. I’m grateful for the privilege to interact with the very lovely members of my team, for the space to ask the dumbest questions (and not feel silly or judged), and for the privilege to learn.

Here’s a video telling the story of the birth of Red Cross, pretty impressive to note that simple care/love/regard for the next man was at the heart of this massive body we have today, 160 years and still going strong!

A few bits and bobs about the Red Cross flags (and so far there are three). I took notes on our induction day

  • The flag with the cross is just the Swiss flag inverted and is the third most recognized trademark symbol in the world, next to McDonald’s and Coca Cola.
  • The Flag with the crescent is the Turkish flag inverted and was adopted because Islamic countries felt the movement was originally Christian (and it is not).
  • The flag with the star was adopted in 2005 because Israel, followers of the Star of David, refused to use either of the two already existing symbols.

With a 100 million members and currently in 189 countries (of the 208 recognized by the UN), we (yes o) are the largest humanitarian organization around today. Whoop!

From identifying and catering to various appearances of trauma and injury, to building my confidence, and the satisfaction that comes from knowing I can provide First Aid (I’d mention I’m now a certified First Aider but I’m much too modest for that), I’m grateful I yielded to the nudging to get up and sign up already!

A few photos off our training nights…

Learned how to fit neck braces safely and securely...

Learned how to fit neck braces safely and securely…

Bumped your head? Let me wrap it up for you!

Bumped your head? Let me wrap it up for you!

Sling day... Decent, safe, and secure enough to prevent further injury...

Sling day… Decent, safe, and secure enough to prevent further injury…

To be honest, there are some Monday nights I’d rather be curled up in bed, at the movies or some other fun activity (especially during the winter) but the time and money sacrificed to get to and from my meetings always leave me feeling satisfied, a little wiser than I was at the beginning of the day. Plus there’s always a hot cuppa something to take the bite off!

So, do you volunteer anywhere? Officially or unofficially? Share what it’s about in the comments section. What excites you about it?

And for the children of God reading who currently not volunteering anywhere, I’m greeting you o! Lol. I’m not judging o (God forbid) but I’d encourage you to give your time and energy to a cause you’re passionate about. It doesn’t have to be the Red Cross (wherever you are obviously), but find something you’d be happy to commit to and inconvenience yourself for every now and then. Will you? Let me know when you do!

Enhanced by Zemanta

So I was in Nigeria at the end of February (don’t even ask why I’m writing about this now), and it was such a blessing to be home! My father surprised me by meeting me at the airport, and my sister waited at home for me so I could take my nephew to school! What a joy, especially since he recognized me!

I love him to pieces!

I love him to pieces!

I spent six days in Abuja, and I promise you I could blog about every single day I spent with my boy! I learned a lot of things from him too, and that’s what this chronicle is about.

  1. Children do exactly what they see adults do, not really what you say. Apart from ‘Mummy’ and ‘Daddy’, the constants in my nephew’s mouth are ‘sit down’, ‘no, no, no, no, no’, shut the door’, etc., all with the accompanying hand gestures! Hilarious. First time he wagged his baby fingers while Skyping me, I nearly fell from my chair with laughter.

We’ve got videos of Boo Boo doing squats because his mom and I were doing them, and there’s the time he picked up his belt and started jumping with his arms stretched out in front of him…again because he’d seen his Momma skipping earlier!

Lesson: Be careful – you can give a million pieces of advice, but it is what you do that your children will do.

  1. The award for short attention span – has to go to children. The younger, the shorter. Once you understand this point to the ‘t’, you will live a long and prosperous life! By long and prosperous I mean you won’t burst an artery in anger because it seems like you’re saying the same thing over and over again! Cue me telling Boo Boo not to touch the keyboard on my laptop when we’re watching anything on it. I tell him, he takes his fingers off. Exactly 90 seconds after, you’ll hear, “Boo Boo but I told you not to touch it”… and another 60 seconds later, sigh.
  1. Their little gestures make everything worth it. One of the days on this trip was very difficult, it seemed like everything that could go wrong, went wrong and by the end of the day, I was truly upset with it all.

I got home, and as soon as I walked in the door Boo Boo looked up and shouted ‘Mama’, and ran to hug me. The light in his eyes, the excitement in his voice, and the big cuddle we shared made everything ok. Instantly.

  1. Curiosity killed the cat – what I actually meant to say is that the curiosity of your little one will kill (literally) a few o four possessions. Not because they are inherently destructive, but because their minds are expanding, and it is understanding things around them that causes this expansion. God is a rock star in the sense that often times the things little children are drawn to play a big part in determining what careers they go for later in life.

We set Boo Boo down in the living room to watch reruns of Muppet Show ( I have no faith in the cartoons of today): my sister and I were sorting his clothes in the room.

After a little while we felt like going to check on him (since he had been worryingly quiet), and here’s what we found.

His majesty had separated the remote! What amused me most was the way he didn’t even flinch when we came into the living room, like in his mind, he hadn’t done anything out of the ordinary.

Crossed legs and everything, my baby is a boss!

Crossed legs and everything, my baby is a boss!

Let’s end this with me calling my sister a couple nights ago to ask her to Skype me later so I could chat with Boo Boo (like to do this at least once a week so he doesn’t forget me) and she said she couldn’t.

Why?

His majesty had immersed her iPad in a bucket of water! By the time she found, out, it had soaked, and the prayer became, “Oh God please let it work again, or let me be able to claim on my insurance”!

But we thank God for children everyday because they are a joy, a blessing, an absolute gift from God that give our lives meaning and instill responsibility in us. And today I celebrate my nephew, praising God for the cutest baby on earth, my nephew Boo Boo!

Enhanced by Zemanta