Posts Tagged ‘Beauty’

So my friend Bella put up a Facebook post recently, and it spoke to me in a very distinct way.

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My comment? “Ha ha ha… I love it! Plus I love “rehearsing my rights in my head”… sometimes God has stuff in store for us but we resist the change, holding on to what we think we have…” Somehow the thought didn’t leave me so I thought I’d write about it (and I have Bella’s permission to share).

Picture this: we’re holding on to something we think is precious, maybe something we achieved by ourselves, or might even be something He put in our hands.

And then God says, I want to give you something better, want to upgrade you, and we refuse. We go up in arms because we’ve gotten comfortable wherever we are or with whatever we have that we refuse to let Him have His sweet way in our lives.

Interesting how a lot of us can relate to this, and how much God rolls His eyes at us sometimes. We know He doesn’t do any less thing, we know He gives only good and perfect gifts, we know we are the Apple of His eye and He is aware of every hair that falls from our heads, yet we don’t trust Him enough to give us better than we have? Sigh.

Was a learning moment for me, more like a reminder that sometimes it’s okay to let go. Let go of good so we have room for better, let go of better to receive God’s best. It’s for our own good.

Have a good one!

PS: This photo is so super! I have to find a rooftop to get a photo like this, and soon!

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Olamide is one of those friends that I cannot do without. Does he drive me up the wall? Absolutely. Is he one of the closest friends I have on earth today who I can go to with anything and not feel judged or looked down on? Absolutely. Is he one to uphold his friends in prayer, with words of encouragement, with love, and with physical manifestations of that love? Yes Sir!

I love Olamide (lots and lots), and can I say congratulations on your engagement? She’s a gorgeous lady (in and out), and I wish you both all the joy possible.

I give you @RevDrCraig!

A few days ago I got a surprise call from a friend from school I hadn’t seen in many, many years. That call birthed this piece you now read.

This week I met up with that old acquaintance, a lady whose exceptional beauty back in high school made all the boys go gaga.  She was vacationing in the capital and wanted to know if I could show her around. After picking her up at Euston station, we went to Trafalgar Square, London Eye, Westminster Abbey, Madame Tussauds, Westfield Mall, and goofed around like tourists taking pictures of everything and anything that caught our fancy. As we caught up on the 15 years that had gone by, I couldn’t help but wonder where the ‘wow’ factor went. She was still quite good to look at, but the exquisite beauty she once had seemed to have faded away, or at least paled into a less blinding glare. For the first time since I’d known her, I actually saw who she was, talked to her, wasn’t carried away by her looks, and realized that there was more to her than was so obviously apparent. I wondered how many people, like me, had missed out on seeing a wonderful person simply because all we saw was ‘a fine face and a hot body’.

I really enjoyed spending the day with her and as I walked away from the platform at Euston, I pondered at the absurdity of our generation that ubiquitously employs beauty as the foremost yardstick in the selection of a potential mate. This absurdity was first made apparent to me when, after I announced my engagement a few months ago, an associate of mine clapped me jocularly on the back exclaiming, “You’ve done it bro! Congratulations! You have finally found a woman finer than you who has agreed to marry you”. You see, I met my fiancé last year, just when I was coming out of an extended period of deep self-reflection following a string of very bad decisions. For months, I had been acting out of character and ironically chasing after beauty, weaving in and out of fragile relationships with some of the most beautiful women I had ever met; tall, short, curvy, straight, dark and fair. It took falling in love with this one to make it clear to me that the true worth of a woman is vested, not in the beauty of her face, or the curves on her body, but in the depth of her soul.

When pictures of my fiancé and I emerged, the most frequent comments were those praising her beauty and what a beautiful couple we made. One friend asked jokingly, “Did you conduct a beauty pageant and then propose to the winner?” LOL! Sure, most of these comments were made in good faith and were not in the least bit intended to offend nor did it mean that those who made them were shallow or anything of that sort. They were merely commenting on what they saw weren’t they, admiring a beautiful couple that were sure to have a beautiful marriage? Maybe it was all harmless banter, simple admiration, and unveiled praise.

Unfortunately, the reverse might also be the case. I know this because I too was once stuck in that place where deep in my heart I held to a primitive notion that the more beautiful a couple are, the more likely it was that their marriage would succeed. Perhaps the Disney fairy tales of beautiful princesses and handsome princes that ride off into the sunset and live happily ever after had fatally tainted my view of reality?  I know for certain, that a handful of those reading this now also share this view I once held, for it seems to me that the Ovation wedding culture of the past, once the preserve of the super rich has trickled down and has become the BellaNaija wedding culture of today. It is no secret, however, that some of the most celebrated high-profile weddings of the most gorgeous couples do not even last a year!

So to answer Chioma’s question; “What have I learned?”

I have learnt again something that I should never have forgotten. It took talking to a woman whose beauty once mesmerised me to remind me of a truth I used to know; Indeed, Beauty fades but character is enduring.

To all the beautiful girls out there who have character but are only sought after for their looks, I apologize on behalf of all men. But remember, if that’s all you put on the table, then perhaps that’s all we are inclined to see.

My name is Olamide Craig. I am Nigerian.

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Whoo! Nice to bring back with The Entrepreneur series with this interview! I got talking with Francine Adeoso, CEO/Creative Director at makeup-artist Aberdeen, and mother to a most beautiful daughter!

D Fairy GodSister: Hey babe, welcome to The Entrepreneur! Would you tell us three reasons you think your business stands out from others?

Francesca's take on Natalie's Portman's Black Swan character

Francesca’s take on Natalie’s Portman’s Black Swan character

Francesca: Hello Fairy GodSister! Being in the beauty industry you have to be dynamic and grow with the times. Sadly some artists get left behind because of this. My business is fashion/trend aware yet tailored to every individual, plus it’s fun and very educating.

D Fairy GodSister: What do you mean by ‘grow with the times’?

Francesca: Today the beauty industry has grown immensely. Cosmetics aren’t what they used to be just 10 years ago. Competition has made it that there are a variety of ways to look and feel beautiful; keeping up with these new techniques, products and upcoming companies is how I grow with the times. Your style has to evolve like the industry you’re in.

D Fairy GodSister: Have you always wanted to be involved with cosmetics and make up artistry or you just dabbled?

Francesca: Well I’ve always considered myself artistic, not on paper I’m afraid, but in my expression and way of life generally. I’ve always been ‘artsy’. Makeup however was a different ballgame. But I found it was one thing that came naturally to me. It never seemed like a chore or task it just flowed. I started experimenting on myself as most artists do and when I discovered I loved makeup, the journey began. So it was just a dabble in the end I guess or fate as I always say.

D Fairy GodSister: You seem to have a thing for bridal makeup. Is that what you’re most comfortable with?

Francesca: Funny enough that was the real dabble. I’ve always been more of an editorial artist. I love the freedom of expression that comes with that. It’s creative and most times I discover a lot about artistry, my products and myself after a shoot just because you get to work with other people. However when I moved to Scotland I decided to do more bridal work. I’m in love with the bridal atmosphere, its unrivalled. The fact that you get to spend that time with someone on such an important day of their life is always humbling to me. I love the transformation, and you feel more rewarded when you see how happy you’ve made a bride on such a day. It’s lovely experience.

D Fairy GodSister: What’s an editorial artist?

Francesca: Editorial shoots are mainly what I enjoy. A common misconception is the term an editorial artist. The gig is what is editorial not the artist. In an editorial shoot you’re not just showcasing the makeup or clothes etc. You’re conveying more of a theme or a story as opposed to a beauty shoot, which enhances the models features, or fashion makeup that should enhance the fashion being showcased not distract from it. So an editorial shoot could have an avant-garde or androgynous theme. So when I say editorial artist I’m referring to the type of work I not necessarily the type of makeup.

An example of  a 'fashion editorial'

An example of a ‘fashion editorial’. The portfolio is here

D Fairy GodSister: New knowledge, thank you! Do you think the market is saturated? Like, everyone is a makeup artist these days?

Francesca: Hahahaha, well it seems that way for sure. But I always say as long as you enjoy your craft and you’re willing to invest time and effort to it then do. There’s enough room for everyone! What I’m not a fan of is waking up one morning, doing a friend’s makeup and bam! You call yourself a makeup artist.

D Fairy GodSister: Lol! Shutting down now, how do you cope with being an entrepreneur and a mother?

Francesca: Oh wow, I could write a book on this one! But I can honestly say that having a supportive husband makes my life and work an enjoyable balance. I don’t feel that either aspect suffers. It’s hard and requires a lot of love to set up a business on your own but it’s worth it. I am the very first example of a working mum that my daughter will see so I have that ringing in my ear everyday. I aim to pave the way for her, be a great example and most of all show her that her dreams are achievable, just like my husband has taught me.

Beauty shot...

Beauty shot…

D Fairy GodSister: Awww…. Bless you! Do you find yourself trying out stuff on her?

Francesca: Well, he watches me a lot and she’s at that age where colours excite her. But no, not yet. She’ll only try on my lipsticks from my kisses *smile*

D Fairy GodSister: You’ve been great Francesca! Any final words? Messages to your fans?

Francesca: awww thanks love! My final words would be ‘you are your brand’. Don’t act a certain way and think it won’t be transferred to your brand! Be patient and start out right, it’s harder to re-brand after selling yourself short or making a wrong first impression. And finally be kind! No matter how brilliant or pretty you are no one would care about that of you are mean!

D Fairy GodSister: Thank you Francesca!

Francesca: Awww thanks love and thank you for the opportunity, I enjoy chatting to you as always. Hugs!

The lovely Francesca!

The lovely Francesca!

D Fairy GodSister: Introduce us to Obi Darbas please?

OBIS DARBAS: My full name is Obiamaka Adabanya but for the purpose of not twisting your tongue I’m otherwise called “OBIS DARBAS”…..I am a Geologist, but a Geologist with a passion for makeup. Presently, I am a professional freelance makeup artist.

The Glam One herself!

D Fairy GodSister: What’s the relationship between Geology and make up artistry?

OBIS DARBAS: Ha ha ha ha ha! I wish I knew. First of all, I studied Geology back in the University. Secondly, I am a very stylish and fashionable person. Complimenting that is the fact that applying my makeup gave me an additional boost of beauty. I’m on a journey to spread that inner beauty….

D Fairy GodSister: So it’s all about spreading the beauty? Nothing to do with the money? Especially since you’ve done some work for some really big names!

OBIS DARBAS: Initially, I started helping the girls in school to shape their brows, choose the right foundation, eye shadow and do the entire makeup application for free. It just gave me joy. However I got a makeup job for an advertising company back in school. They paid me well, but I still did the usual freebies back on campus. This happened for about five years until two years ago, I took professional classes. And now….booyahhh! I do it for the joy and money….

D Fairy GodSister: Ha ha ha! I like the booyaah part! So, is it like a day job now? Or you’re in a geologist by day, makeup artist by night place now?

OBIS DARBAS: LOL….There is no day and night thing. I just have a way of roping both of them in. Most of my makeup jobs fall during the weekend. So it’s a win-win situation!

Beautiful, beautiful bride!

D Fairy GodSister: Tell us about the MUD deal…

OBIS DARBAS: MUD deal? Loool. Well MUD is one of the makeup schools I attended. The other one is Ulta (Chicago). I would say I was an outstanding student at MUD. After I graduated I’ve always been offered the opportunity to come lecture students and invigilate their exams, till date. MUD is like a parent to me….

D Fairy GodSister: Awww, and thanks for the clarification! What’s the biggest job you’ve done so far?

OBIS DARBAS: Ha! What’s your definition of biggest job? The pay? I classify mine by opportunity though. The pay may not necessarily be the “factor”….

One of her many clients…..

D Fairy GodSister: Nope, I meant the workload. I’ll explain. So let’s say you had to cater to a bride and 14 bridesmaids, that kind of big.

OBIS DARBAS: Oh I see! I have done a bride, the bride’s mum and six bridesmaids. And on that same day had to do three different looks for the bride’s different costumes. Funny enough, over time once I do the bride’s trial before her big day, they never want me to do their train. Reason is they don’t want my magic to make their brides maids any prettier than them!

D Fairy GodSister: Lol!!! Seriously?

OBIS DARBAS: Yup!

D Fairy GodSister: Do you always do a trial for brides?

OBIS DARBAS: Yes I always do. Usually two weeks to two months before their big day. Complexion and facial stress are things I need to sit and discuss with the bride.

D Fairy GodSister: Hmmmm. Do you ever have difficult clients? Have you ever seen a client and thought, “there’s nothing I can do to help this one’?

OBIS DARBAS: Oh Lord have mercy, yes I have!! You know what? Even while I was self-taught and at makeup school, I’ve always prayed never to meet difficult faces but trust me, I meet them on a regular. And they are usually willing to pay so much just to make sure I cover it all. However they have been my greatest joys because I see that I can hide/enhance some facial features and lift the burden for a day from their chest. Anyways that’s what I’m paid to do…”Glam them up”!

D Fairy GodSister: Whoop! Have you ever made a mistake? Like, scraped off the whole brow, used the wrong colors, etc?

OBIS DARBAS: No. I’m a very cautious person. That’s why I do a trial to avoid such mistakes. I always tell the brides to grow their brows for a while. And we work together to get the exact foundation/eye shadow/lipstick shade that best suits their complexion.

D Fairy GodSister: Who in this line of business has had the biggest influence on you?

OBIS DARBAS: I have been influenced by International celebrity makeup artist Wayne Goss. I have indeed learnt a lot from him. He is a makeup guru!

Pretty!!

D Fairy GodSister: Well done!! As we wrap up, what’s the place of your family in all this?

OBIS DARBAS: They know it’s something I love to bless people with and I have gotten the necessary support from them, even though they see a necessity for me to grow my oil & gas career.

D Fairy GodSister: Thank God for family right? What do you think of the makeup businesses springing up every day the days? Are you threatened?

OBIS DARBAS: Yes o, thank God for family! Makeup has a large market in Nigeria. There are millions of people you can apply it on, as a business it is quite lucrative too. People tend to believe we should struggle for the same clients but I’m not threatened because when you have excellence in your field, you will be preferred.

D Fairy GodSister: If you’re a geologist Monday to Friday and a makeup artist on the weekends, doesn’t leave time for much else does it? When do you have time for fun stuff? And what do you do for fun?

OBIS DARBAS: I’m not busy every weekend. There are some jobs I hand over to my assistant. During free weekends I cook, watch lots of TV and spend time with my loved ones.

D Fairy GodSister: Final question; where do you see OBIS DARBAS by 2015? As a young woman, an entrepreneur, and a geologist?

OBIS DARBAS: By God’s grace I would own a progressive and recognized makeup academy + Celebrity Fashion Stylist + Logistics and Supply Chain Consultant to Oil & Gas Upstream Companies.

D Fairy GodSister: All the best with that! Thank you so much babes for your time!!

OBIS DARBAS: You’re welcome! Anytime!

I totally love this one!!!

Do you want to feel glamorous? Get in touch with Obis Darbas on Twitter (@obisdarbas), on the phone (00 234 803 929 6796), via Blackberry (BB pin : 2609c524) or via her Facebook page, Glam by Obis!